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Building works in new house

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tango2082
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Building works in new house

#95442

Postby tango2082 » November 13th, 2017, 7:56 pm

Good evening,

I'm moving house probably after Christmas into a house that needs some work doing it it - Structurally fine but decoratively hasn't been touched in probably 30 years. It'll require a new kitchen & bathroom, as well as new carpets and wallpaper / paint. I'd like to remove the wall between the kitchen and the living room to make it open plan with a kitchen island.

Although I am handy enough doing the decorating, I've never done any real building work in a house. Apologies that this is probably quite a basic question, but I'd like to get the work done relatively quickly so planning it out best I can!

My thoughts are firstly get in a structural engineer to look at the wall, I'm not sure if it's load bearing so will have to get it assessed. Do I need any form of planning permission if it turns out to be, or just the structural engineers report?

Then I am thinking get a builder in to quote - would it be simplest / most cost effective to get the same tradesman to do all the work - take the wall down, do the kitchen and bathroom and a few other bits I need to do? Do I need to have a provisional kitchen plan to give to the builder at this stage or just give them in idea of what I want and then we'd refine it as it's finalised? I'd assume I'd order the kitchen and bathroom, but if I wanted an internal door replaced, do I order things like this too, or would the builder typically supply based on something I agreed?

Any other obvious considerations?

This sort of thing is new to me so I'm trying to get my head around the right way of doing it!

Regards
Tango

3george
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Re: Building works in new house

#95535

Postby 3george » November 14th, 2017, 9:52 am

I'd be inclined to start with getting a few builders in to discuss what you want based on a simple list as follows.

As far as I know you won't need planning permission for internal changes - but perhaps building control if structural changes are undertaken.

Someone like Howdens or Benchmarx will do an outline kitchen plan that your builder can use to purchase and install from.

Task List :-

1. Remove wall ( liaise with structural engineer as necessary )
2. Supply and fit kitchen ( and white goods ?? )
3. Flooring
4. Tiling
5. Heating
6. Extra items

bungeejumper
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Re: Building works in new house

#95668

Postby bungeejumper » November 14th, 2017, 5:20 pm

Structural engineer is a good idea if you think the kitchen wall removal will require building regs approval. Mostly, it does. It certainly helped to smooth the planning path when we knocked our 19th century kitchen through. I doubt you'd be allowed to knock any wall through without getting the nod from the building regs people.

Would I ask my builder to install a kitchen? Chances are that he'd just subcontract the job out and then charge you double. It's a precision job for which not all builders have what it takes on their own. We used our own installer.

In a 30 year old house, the electrics are due for a check-over, because cabling specs have changed and because stuff will be getting a bit long in the tooth. Then again, when planning for a knock-through kitchen you might want to follow the modern trend and have a completely separate ring main installed just for the kitchen, which I doubt you've got at the moment?

The rule of thumb for a kitchen is to figure out how many sockets etc you need, and then double it. Our 22 foot kitchen has 20, I think, including a very useful double in the island itself. It's about right.

Lighting? Power to outbuildings? A security system? This is a good time to be thinking about these things, before you plaster up and the opportunity is gone.

Plumbing? Positioning of radiators? The same applies. When we bought Bungee Towers 23 years ago (as a semi-wreck), we put washbasins in most of the bedrooms while the floorboards were up. Small money, we've never regretted it.

Etcetera. Good luck.

BJ

csearle
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Re: Building works in new house

#95697

Postby csearle » November 14th, 2017, 6:11 pm

Just to dwell on the electrics a moment longer...

You need to consider whether the hob is gas or electric. If it is electric it will need its own circuit; if gas it will need a socket for the ignition.

Socket for extractor hood.

Single socket for each under-cupboard appliance (typically dishwasher, washing machine, fridge, freezer, wine cooler).

Electric ovens often just need a socket too but some require their own circuit.

As BJ has said, sockets for general use (all 300mm away from hob and sink/drainer).

Main lighting (think about where it should be switched from - possible two-waying from multiple kitchen entrances)

Outside light switch near ourside door(s)

Under unit lights (think about where it should be switched from)

Plinth lights (think about where it should be switched from)

Other accessories: plinth heater, boiler, waste disposal, boiling water tap, under-floor heating, wall lights.

The kitchen is one of the heaviest electrical loads normally and so, as has been said, benefits from its own dedicated circuit. All the wiring should be done after the wall is down and the old kitchen has been ripped out, but before the plasterer comes in to make everything look nice again (probably a couple of days work). A further visit will be necessary to fit the wiring accessories and test the circuits for the certificate.

Regards,
Chris

tango2082
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Re: Building works in new house

#95723

Postby tango2082 » November 14th, 2017, 7:41 pm

Evening all,

Thanks for your input, some good points to consider!

Csearle - Are you an electrician? I've a feeling I've met you at a Fool social many, many years ago at the Granta, and so suspect I'm in the same area as you? Might be wrong!

Tango

stewamax
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Re: Building works in new house

#95751

Postby stewamax » November 14th, 2017, 9:54 pm

One (not foolproof) way to get an idea if a wall is load-bearing is simply to go in the loft and have a look. If you have an 'old-style' roof construction with massive longitudinal wooden purlins, these may rest on internal walls or (stronger) on chimney breastwork. You need to be very careful when disturbing such brickwork: if you knock such walls out lower down, make sure that the ends of the RSJ you use are supported adequately: you may even need piers installing to take the weight.

csearle
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Re: Building works in new house

#95764

Postby csearle » November 14th, 2017, 10:31 pm

tango2082 wrote:Csearle - Are you an electrician? I've a feeling I've met you at a Fool social many, many years ago at the Granta, and so suspect I'm in the same area as you? Might be wrong!
Hi, yes we met at the Cambridge social and I remember you distinctly for all the right reasons. Yes I'm an electrician. But I'm in Tunbridge Wells in Kent.

Chris

tango2082
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Re: Building works in new house

#96030

Postby tango2082 » November 15th, 2017, 7:37 pm

csearle wrote:
tango2082 wrote:Csearle - Are you an electrician? I've a feeling I've met you at a Fool social many, many years ago at the Granta, and so suspect I'm in the same area as you? Might be wrong!
Hi, yes we met at the Cambridge social and I remember you distinctly for all the right reasons. Yes I'm an electrician. But I'm in Tunbridge Wells in Kent.

Chris


Maybe not quite the same area then! Thanks very much for your advice - I'm sure once I've moved in I'll have more SFQ's :-)

Tango


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