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Doorlock

Does what it says on the tin
pancake101
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Doorlock

#209206

Postby pancake101 » March 21st, 2019, 7:14 pm

The other morning it took a long time to remove the key when I tried to look the door. In fact it would not lock and let the key be free. I had to unlock it and work the key out.

The inside lock was fine so locked it there and went out the other door.

Now, I cannot get the key in, on the outside yet when its inserted on the inside it works as normal.

What do I do? The lock is ISEO.

Thanks in advance.

Dod101
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Re: Doorlock

#209216

Postby Dod101 » March 21st, 2019, 7:53 pm

I would get a locksmith.

Dod

pochisoldi
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Re: Doorlock

#209241

Postby pochisoldi » March 21st, 2019, 9:18 pm

pancake101 wrote:The other morning it took a long time to remove the key when I tried to look the door. In fact it would not lock and let the key be free. I had to unlock it and work the key out.

The inside lock was fine so locked it there and went out the other door.

Now, I cannot get the key in, on the outside yet when its inserted on the inside it works as normal.

What do I do? The lock is ISEO.

Thanks in advance.


What type of lock is it?

If it's a eurocylinder (the usual style of lock for uPVC), replacing it is a doddle.
Before you actually buy a new barrel, remove the old one.
Unlock and open the door, locate a single screw which is inline with the key barrel, remove the screw.
Insert the key into the old barrel, it should now be loose but "stuck". Rotate the key about 1/8th of a turn in one direction, whilst pulling on the barrel.
If that doesn't work, return the key to the unlocked position and turn it 1/8th of a turn in the opposite direction.

The locks come in different barrel lengths.
Measure the length of the barrel from the each end to the lock lever in the middle. If the distances are 45mm and 35mm, then you need a 45/35 lock.
If you need to secure the door, fitting the lock is easier than removing it - insert key into barrel, and rotate until the lever doesn't stick out.
Insert barrel+key into door, insert screw, remove key, go shopping.

Note:
1) Euro cylinder locks are interchangeable - you don't need to fit an ISEO barrel, you could fit a snap-proof Yale (for example).
2) Don't fit a lock barrel which is too big. The more of the lock that sticks out, the easier it is for someone to try and snap the lock with a pair of large pliers.

If you've got a wooden door with a 5 lever mortice lock, forget what I've just posted, and get some one in. The lock will either need lubricating or is worn and needs replacing - if you only lock/unlock from the outside, then that side will tend to wear more.

Urbandreamer
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Re: Doorlock

#209249

Postby Urbandreamer » March 21st, 2019, 10:04 pm

pochisoldi wrote:If it's a eurocylinder (the usual style of lock for uPVC), replacing it is a doddle.
....


Totally agree, and ignore the rest. I have edited the post when I looked up ISCO locks.

pochisoldi wrote:If you've got a wooden door with a 5 lever mortice lock, forget what I've just posted, and get some one in. The lock will either need lubricating or is worn and needs replacing - if you only lock/unlock from the outside, then that side will tend to wear more.


I disagree with the bit about getting someone in.

I can work while there is someone in the house so I would remove the lock and take it to a DIY shop to get one the same size. Then fit the new one.
Failing that they actually only come in about 3 sizes*. You can remove it and take three or four photos with a rule to get the dimensions. Then find one that matches those dimentions.

Finally, do you have a spare key? If so then try that and if it works, use it to get another cut that you will use and despose of the current key that you are using by dropping it in a litter bin or at the tip with no identification. Older locks came with brass keys with the idea that the key wore before the lock. Hence your key may have worn and the levers may not be EXACTLY in the centre of the lock. That would cause the key not to engage propperly on one side.

Seriously, locks are simple devices. Replacing them is easy, if you can use a screwdriver. Manufacturers try to make it easy. Many are actually quite insecure, but popular perception causes us to think that they are secure.

*Well in our and our parents lifetime. If you have a key that looks like it belongs to a church then you WILL need either serious DIY skills or a professional.

Dod101
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Re: Doorlock

#209318

Postby Dod101 » March 22nd, 2019, 10:14 am

I must say that I am not much of DIY person, and if you feel competent then do as suggested, but you did ask!

Dod

pochisoldi
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Re: Doorlock

#209324

Postby pochisoldi » March 22nd, 2019, 10:23 am

Urbandreamer wrote:I disagree with the bit about getting someone in.

I can work while there is someone in the house so I would remove the lock and take it to a DIY shop to get one the same size. Then fit the new one.
Failing that they actually only come in about 3 sizes*. You can remove it and take three or four photos with a rule to get the dimensions. Then find one that matches those dimentions.

Finally, do you have a spare key? If so then try that and if it works, use it to get another cut that you will use and despose of the current key that you are using by dropping it in a litter bin or at the tip with no identification. Older locks came with brass keys with the idea that the key wore before the lock. Hence your key may have worn and the levers may not be EXACTLY in the centre of the lock. That would cause the key not to engage propperly on one side.

Seriously, locks are simple devices. Replacing them is easy, if you can use a screwdriver. Manufacturers try to make it easy. Many are actually quite insecure, but popular perception causes us to think that they are secure.

*Well in our and our parents lifetime. If you have a key that looks like it belongs to a church then you WILL need either serious DIY skills or a professional.


You're right, I just didn't want to lure the OP into doing something they might not be happy with.
Replacing a mortice lock with an identical replacement is a doddle - if you can get an identical replacement. (Sourcing an identical 5 lever Chubb will be easier than sourcing a 5 lever <random own brand> lock...)
Removing and opening the lock to clean and lubricate isn't that difficult, just need to be careful to remember where any springs go, ensure that the levers go back in the same order you removed them, and that you need to use a graphite lock lubricant not a mineral oil like 3in1.

If I had to enlarge the hole for a mortice lock, or repair damage done by an attack, then I would get some one in (and replace the standard 5 lever mortice lock "action" with a lock with a 6 pin Euro Cylinder barrel.

PochiSoldi

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Re: Doorlock

#209326

Postby stewamax » March 22nd, 2019, 10:37 am

pochisoldi wrote:you need to use a graphite lock lubricant not a mineral oil like 3in1

I'll second that. Mineral oil tends to clog, particularly in cold weather.
A powdered-graphite puffer is not expensive and lasts for ever.
(Useful for car door locks too!)

Watis
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Re: Doorlock

#209328

Postby Watis » March 22nd, 2019, 10:46 am

stewamax wrote:
pochisoldi wrote:you need to use a graphite lock lubricant not a mineral oil like 3in1

I'll second that. Mineral oil tends to clog, particularly in cold weather.
A powdered-graphite puffer is not expensive and lasts for ever.
(Useful for car door locks too!)



Seconded.

I had to buy my powdered-graphite puffer from Amazon as, when I asked for this in a real life hardware store, they didn't know what I was talking about!

Watis

pancake101
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Re: Doorlock

#209844

Postby pancake101 » March 24th, 2019, 5:20 pm

Thank you all.

I can lock it from the inside so wont do anything drastic yet other than buying the powdered graphite. There are two screws at the level of the lock to me even more confused. So if the stuff does not work along with another key, I'll get someone to look at it.

Pancake


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