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My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

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ten0rman
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My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167557

Postby ten0rman » September 19th, 2018, 8:57 pm

I've often said how reliable my Toyota Avensis is. No longer - it has had it's first failure which is not due to fair wear & tear. It's 5 1/2 years old, done 75K miles, gone through 8 tyres, one battery, one set of discs & various discpads, and the odd bulb or three - all of which I consider to be fair wear & tear. It's even had a new internal mirror courtesy of Mrs T knocking off the original, so really it's not done too badly.

So what's gone wrong? Only one of the rear calipers has been playing up and will now have to be replaced.

Now some of you will no doubt argue that at this age a sticky caliper should be considered fair wear & tear. I'm afraid I disagree, especially as my tame mechanic mentioned the so-called electronic handbrake at the same time. I contend that a standard lever operated handbrake may well not have this problem, indeed I can't recall having to change calipers on any other vehicle. I might be wrong, but I don't think so. Pads, yes, even the odd disc or two, but not a caliper.

Black mark, Toyota.

ten0rman

tsr2
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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167641

Postby tsr2 » September 20th, 2018, 10:12 am

ten0rman wrote:Now some of you will no doubt argue that at this age a sticky caliper should be considered fair wear & tear. I'm afraid I disagree, especially as my tame mechanic mentioned the so-called electronic handbrake at the same time. I contend that a standard lever operated handbrake may well not have this problem, indeed I can't recall having to change calipers on any other vehicle. I might be wrong, but I don't think so. Pads, yes, even the odd disc or two, but not a caliper.


I've had sticky calipers on 2 cars, a 2000 MGF and a 2003 Skoda Octavia. Both of those have lever operated handbrakes.

I can't remember if the caliper actually had to be replaced on the Skoda. I think the garage might have just freed it up. Thinking about it, the Skoda might have suffered a sticky caliper twice in the eight years I had it.

bungeejumper
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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167646

Postby bungeejumper » September 20th, 2018, 10:26 am

ten0rman wrote:So what's gone wrong? Only one of the rear calipers has been playing up and will now have to be replaced.

Now some of you will no doubt argue that at this age a sticky caliper should be considered fair wear & tear. I'm afraid I disagree, especially as my tame mechanic mentioned the so-called electronic handbrake at the same time. I contend that a standard lever operated handbrake may well not have this problem, indeed I can't recall having to change calipers on any other vehicle. I might be wrong, but I don't think so. Pads, yes, even the odd disc or two, but not a caliper.

A bit harsh, possibly. The wife's Polo (basic but fun car) was prone to a sticky caliper on the rear nearside, which eventually had to be replaced at six years. Might have been caused by the handbrake cable snagging. And her trusty VW Golf had gone through two aircon compressors by the time it was five years old. (Thank goodness for an extended warranty.) Didn't stop it from being an excellent car, though.

My Toyota's four years old now, and it still has another year of the manufacturer's warranty still to run, but it has had no issues at all since I bought it at 18 months. The day when European car manufacturers are willing to put a 5 year warranty on their workmanship, like the Japanese and the Koreans do, will be the day when we know that things are improving.

I don't know whether you've seen the latest What Car reliability surveys, BTW, but that also didn't look good for the Euro manufacturers. Rangies, Jags, Volvos were all heavily represented at the bottom end. Although, to be fair, so were quite a few Nissans. Which are half French anyway. Which explains everything. :lol: Or not.

BJ

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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167693

Postby Raptor » September 20th, 2018, 1:54 pm

Brought my Toyota Yaris 10 years ago. Only normal wear and tear until a couple of weeks ago (48,000 miles). Gearbox now only has 1st 3rd and 6th. Toyota has quoted anything up to £1400. Local garage wanted £1900 for replacement gearbox and clutch. At least Toyota said that their gearbox guy will strip it down to see if it is something simple. My first major breakdown on any car for nearly 40 years other than a brand new Citroen Zantia with a faulty petrol flow detector that cut out the engine at 70 mph but never failed when in the garage (turned out heat from engine block caused the detector to malfunction, now that was "fun").

Always said when I payout on a car, other than wear and tear, I look to change it. So now diverting share dividends to savings and next year a replacement is on the cards.

Gone are the days when I would strip down and/or replace engines/gearboxes..........

Raptor.

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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167694

Postby Watis » September 20th, 2018, 1:58 pm

Raptor wrote:Brought my Toyota Yaris 10 years ago. Only normal wear and tear until a couple of weeks ago (48,000 miles). Gearbox now only has 1st 3rd and 6th. Toyota has quoted anything up to £1400. Local garage wanted £1900 for replacement gearbox and clutch. At least Toyota said that their gearbox guy will strip it down to see if it is something simple. My first major breakdown on any car for nearly 40 years other than a brand new Citroen Zantia with a faulty petrol flow detector that cut out the engine at 70 mph but never failed when in the garage (turned out heat from engine block caused the detector to malfunction, now that was "fun").

Always said when I payout on a car, other than wear and tear, I look to change it. So now diverting share dividends to savings and next year a replacement is on the cards.

Gone are the days when I would strip down and/or replace engines/gearboxes..........

Raptor.



You are unlucky!

I bought my Yaris ten years ago, too. 82,000 miles now, and just last month I had to replace the wiper blades.

Watis

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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167712

Postby richlist » September 20th, 2018, 3:14 pm

Round of applause for Toyota.

We have a family member with an 8 year old Mercedes Benz, bought new.........they have never had any problems of any kind until this year......wiper blades need replacing. That's the sort of quality i expect but you know what they say.

Hope for the best, plan for the worst.

bungeejumper
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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#167764

Postby bungeejumper » September 20th, 2018, 7:15 pm

Raptor wrote:Brought my Toyota Yaris 10 years ago. Only normal wear and tear until a couple of weeks ago (48,000 miles). Gearbox now only has 1st 3rd and 6th. Toyota has quoted anything up to £1400. Local garage wanted £1900 for replacement gearbox and clutch. At least Toyota said that their gearbox guy will strip it down to see if it is something simple.

A £1400 main dealer bill after 10 years of ownership wouldn't strike most people as too bad. Ask any VW/Audi owner who's paid out £1500 for a DPF filter on a four year old diesel, or £1200 for an EGR valve. Come to that, ask me why the second cam belt on my diesel Focus failed after 35,000 miles and required a £1200 head rebuild?

Often, gear selection failures can be sorted cheaply by adjusting the two gear linkage cables, especially when the three missing gears are all in a line (eg if 1st, 3rd and 6th were all on the upside of the H selector shape). And replacing the gearbox oil has brought many a reluctant gear selector back to life. Just sayin'.

Good luck!

BJ

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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#172206

Postby TheMotorcycleBoy » October 8th, 2018, 8:17 am

We own 3 honda civics with between 155-185k on the clocks, they are about 18-19 years old. Brake calipers are a regular issue on these and many other vehicles probably due to corrosion and road salt+water. Especially the rear calipers, since they don't get as much exercise as the front. I now resort to striping and cleaning up the calipers (and checking the pads run free in their guide shims) on these vehicles once or twice a year. The main benefit from us doing this is that they run a lot quieter and the pad and disc life is better.

Matt

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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#172210

Postby Raptor » October 8th, 2018, 8:32 am

Just to update. The gear selector was sheared and damaged. Replacing that and some other parts, total cost £1200. Parts costs was only £200, £800 pound (10 hours) labour.

Raptor.

BTW. The engineers enjoyed working on this as it is unusual nowadays for them to have much real mechanical work like this to do. Glad they enjoyed it, wish I had. :lol:

TheMotorcycleBoy
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Re: My first non-wear&tear failure on my Toyota

#172228

Postby TheMotorcycleBoy » October 8th, 2018, 10:05 am

Raptor wrote:Just to update. The gear selector was sheared and damaged. Replacing that and some other parts, total cost £1200. Parts costs was only £200, £800 pound (10 hours) labour.

Raptor.

BTW. The engineers enjoyed working on this as it is unusual nowadays for them to have much real mechanical work like this to do. Glad they enjoyed it, wish I had. :lol:


TBH, we get a lot of parts from breakers yards. There's a good network of them online. ("Parts-exchange" or summat, I dunno, Mel does a lot of the searching).

Even if you don't do the work yourself, a lot of back street garages, will receive the breaker-delivered-parts and fit them, but obv. only guarantee their labour.

We've sourced all sorts of stuff like this in the past gearbox, power steering pumps, distributors. All stuff we buy comes (from breakers) with a guarantee for a short time (about 90 days).

Often decent second hand OEM stuff is in better nick than AM brand new, in our experience.

Matt


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