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Windscreen frost covers

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gnawsome
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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252029

Postby gnawsome » September 15th, 2019, 4:33 pm

Itsallaguess wrote:Just want to say thanks to everyone who's offered advice on the windscreen-frost issue.
... so I think I might try the warm-water routine this winter, and see how I get on. I admit that I too thought that regularly putting such thermal-strain on a car windscreen could cause issues, but it seems that there's enough people here that have done it without any issues that I will give it a go this winter.

Cheers,

Itsallaguess


When driving commercial vehicles - parked with no access to warm water - I used the previous day's newspaper rolled into 'spills' and lit. These vehicles had vertical windscreens and just the warming of air close-by was enough to clear the screen (of ice) but was a bit messy tho'

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252128

Postby Watis » September 16th, 2019, 9:29 am

Itsallaguess wrote:Just want to say thanks to everyone who's offered advice on the windscreen-frost issue.

Unfortunately changing cars or moving to Essex isn't practical at this moment in time, so I think I might try the warm-water routine this winter, and see how I get on. I admit that I too thought that regularly putting such thermal-strain on a car windscreen could cause issues, but it seems that there's enough people here that have done it without any issues that I will give it a go this winter.

Thanks again - I'll let you know how I get on if and when we have any hard frosts.

Cheers,

Itsallaguess



For me, warm means body temperature or thereabouts, so I consider the thermal shock to be less than that from washing a car with hot water on a crisp April morning - and no-one ever worries about thermal shock in those circumstances!

Watis

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252142

Postby Itsallaguess » September 16th, 2019, 10:01 am

Watis wrote:
For me, warm means body temperature or thereabouts, so I consider the thermal shock to be less than that from washing a car with hot water on a crisp April morning - and no-one ever worries about thermal shock in those circumstances!


Thanks Waits - that makes sense. I'll try to use warm water rather than anything too hot, and even if I need to make a couple of quick trips then it will still be better than my usual scraping routines on those really cold mornings that we sometimes have in the UK.

I should probably have mentioned in my initial post that on work days I'm a very early starter, so a large part of this issue for me is to help avoid making too much noise in the early mornings, as I don't want to wake any neighbours up with any unnecessary noise if it's at all possible.

I park my car on my drive, so I'm concious that any noise I make at such a time is likely to be unhelpful to others, so a couple of soaks with some warm water does seem like a good solution to this issue for me.

Thanks again to all the helpful advice given on this thread.

Cheers,

Itsallaguess

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252153

Postby ReformedCharacter » September 16th, 2019, 10:21 am

Itsallaguess wrote:I'll try to use warm water rather than anything too hot, and even if I need to make a couple of quick trips then it will still be better than my usual scraping routines on those really cold mornings that we sometimes have in the UK.

Itsallaguess

A watering can with a rose works well. If you fill the can before you retire for the night and leave it somewhere fairly warm you may find it is warm enough without needing recourse to the hot tap and is ready for use.

RC

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252154

Postby Watis » September 16th, 2019, 10:22 am

Itsallaguess wrote:
Watis wrote:
For me, warm means body temperature or thereabouts, so I consider the thermal shock to be less than that from washing a car with hot water on a crisp April morning - and no-one ever worries about thermal shock in those circumstances!


Thanks Waits - that makes sense. I'll try to use warm water rather than anything too hot, and even if I need to make a couple of quick trips then it will still be better than my usual scraping routines on those really cold mornings that we sometimes have in the UK.

I should probably have mentioned in my initial post that on work days I'm a very early starter, so a large part of this issue for me is to help avoid making too much noise in the early mornings, as I don't want to wake any neighbours up with any unnecessary noise if it's at all possible.

I park my car on my drive, so I'm concious that any noise I make at such a time is likely to be unhelpful to others, so a couple of soaks with some warm water does seem like a good solution to this issue for me.

Thanks again to all the helpful advice given on this thread.

Cheers,

Itsallaguess



My method of applying the warm water is to use an indoor watering can so it's quite silent.

But bear in mind that, on the coldest winter mornings, the water will run off the car onto the ground, where it may freeze. So be careful not to slip on the ice that forms - your screams may wake the neighbours!

Watis

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252155

Postby kiloran » September 16th, 2019, 10:29 am

Watis wrote:But bear in mind that, on the coldest winter mornings, the water will run off the car onto the ground, where it may freeze. So be careful not to slip on the ice that forms - your screams may wake the neighbours!
Watis

The car is also a large cold heatsink, so I'd be concerned about the water spreading around and then freezing. Wiper blades, door locks, etc.

I prefer scraping (not even de-icer spray), it's a dry process and no excess water to then potentially freeze.
But I do keep the car in the garage so in reality it's rarely a problem for me.

--kiloran

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252265

Postby Redmires » September 16th, 2019, 5:44 pm

I use a 2 litre milk container of warm water which does the all windows. And give the wipers a quick flick so that the ice doesn't reform.

I'm sure all the scrapers on here are fully compliant with the law but how many times does one see a "scraper" peering out of a 6" square hole that they deem sufficient while the rest of the car is frosted over.

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252374

Postby DrFfybes » September 17th, 2019, 9:29 am

redsturgeon wrote:Thats why you don't use boiling water, just fill a jug from your hot tap. Never cracked one.

John


I tend to use lukewarm water from a milk carton for the same reason - the trick is to get the water off with a squeegee before it freezes again. I've never cracked one, nor seen anyone crack one and a lot of people used to do the same thing in Plymouth, so I suspect it is something someone did in the late 70s when the bead winters came and word got around it was a dumb idea.

One difference is that in the Deep South the frosts tend to be a lot lighter, and one day a neighbour asked why I always parked outside his house in winter and mine in summer. "Because your side gets the sun first thing and starts to thaw the car".

We've used screen covers, but then they get damp as they thaw and you need to dry them before re-using them.

Paul

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#252444

Postby AF62 » September 17th, 2019, 6:35 pm

For the last 10 years it wasn't an issue as I had a Ford with a heated windscreen, which supplemented by a quick squirt of de-icer meant I was off and away in 30 seconds.

Before that I used the warm water technique. The only issue I found was if you had a number of days where it stayed below zero all day then there was a risk of the water freezing on the ground.

This year the Ford is gone and replaced with a VW with a non-heated screen, so I will also be trying the screen covers.

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#254307

Postby bionichamster » September 27th, 2019, 11:30 am

I have one of the cheap Lidl windscreen covers, cost around £3-£4, works fine but you’ve still got to do the side windows and rear....

Downside is if it rains then freezes also if you put it in the car and it has frost or ice on it you are just introducing dampness.

I tend to use the warm (not hot) water route for the other windows and that works well except at very low temps ie. around -5 and below when the water can freeze quickly once it has cooled, probably not an issue for a new car with a decent heater and seals but my 15+ year old hatchback has had problems with the water freezing on the window, and in the door.

The good thing about the window cover is that the window is dry.

Bh

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Re: Windscreen frost covers

#255070

Postby DrFfybes » October 1st, 2019, 8:48 am

bionichamster wrote:
I tend to use the warm (not hot) water route for the other windows and that works well except at very low temps ie. around -5 and below when the water can freeze quickly once it has cooled, probably not an issue for a new car with a decent heater and seals but my 15+ year old hatchback has had problems with the water freezing on the window, and in the door.

Bh


I had forgotten about the 'frozen door' issue - we get that on our old Toyota presumably due to the seals allowing or trapping water between them and the door. A couple of years ago I wiped some silicon grease along the face of the seals which seemed to solve it - I might give it another go tomorrow when it is supposed to be dry down here.

Paul


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