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Late birth registrations

Genealogy, Local, General
ArrandoraStarr
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Joined: July 22nd, 2019, 9:12 pm
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Late birth registrations

#238524

Postby ArrandoraStarr » July 22nd, 2019, 9:19 pm

DAK know of any cases of late birth registrations? The case I'm looking into is one where the child's birth was registered in the UK exactly 6 months after birth. I always thought the deadline was 42 days. I've since heard - anecdotally - of this happening before when the parents married after the initial registration, but that wasn't the case here.

Slarti
Lemon Quarter
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Re: Late birth registrations

#238708

Postby Slarti » July 23rd, 2019, 4:47 pm

From Wikipedia
"In the early days of the system, it was up to each local registrar to find out what births, marriages and deaths had taken place in his sub-district. It has therefore been estimated that only about 50–60% of births, both legitimate and illegitimate, were registered as parents were not legally obliged to inform the registrar. It has been estimated that in some parts of England up to 15% of births were not registered between 1837 and 1875.[6] As a result of the Births and Deaths Act 1874, registration was made compulsory from 1875 and the onus was now on parents to inform the registrar when they had a child and penalties were imposed on those who failed to register. Births had to be registered within 42 days at the district or sub-district office, usually by the mother or father. If more days had elapsed but it was less than three months since the birth, the superintendent registrar had to be present and if between three months and a year, the registration could only be authorised by the Registrar General. "

Births at sea were a particular problem, if during a long voyage.

I have one in my tree where the village in the Cheviots was effectively cut off from the registration district for about 4 months, through winter weather.

HTH
Slarti

ArrandoraStarr
Posts: 2
Joined: July 22nd, 2019, 9:12 pm
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Re: Late birth registrations

#240898

Postby ArrandoraStarr » July 31st, 2019, 9:17 pm

Slarti wrote:From Wikipedia
"In the early days of the system, it was up to each local registrar to find out what births, marriages and deaths had taken place in his sub-district. It has therefore been estimated that only about 50–60% of births, both legitimate and illegitimate, were registered as parents were not legally obliged to inform the registrar. It has been estimated that in some parts of England up to 15% of births were not registered between 1837 and 1875.[6] As a result of the Births and Deaths Act 1874, registration was made compulsory from 1875 and the onus was now on parents to inform the registrar when they had a child and penalties were imposed on those who failed to register. Births had to be registered within 42 days at the district or sub-district office, usually by the mother or father. If more days had elapsed but it was less than three months since the birth, the superintendent registrar had to be present and if between three months and a year, the registration could only be authorised by the Registrar General. "

Births at sea were a particular problem, if during a long voyage.

I have one in my tree where the village in the Cheviots was effectively cut off from the registration district for about 4 months, through winter weather.

HTH
Slarti


Thank you. The plot thickens, however, as the birth in question happened in the late 1970s.


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