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any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

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paulnumbers
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any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

#273006

Postby paulnumbers » December 23rd, 2019, 8:38 am

If I picked the wrong board, sorry, happy to post somewhere else.

Grandma had a fall yesterday. She lives in a local authority funded care home. She’s back in the care home now, broken wrist and plaster cast.

Should we be involving the local authority? Asking for review of care plan to provide more one on one care? She cant use the facilities etc by herself right now or get out of bed by herself. NHS were very keen to get her out of the hospital which seemed harsh at the time but she seems happier back in her normal surroundings.

Any thoughts / suggestions gratefully received.

didds
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Re: any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

#273019

Postby didds » December 23rd, 2019, 10:09 am

paulnumbers wrote: NHS were very keen to get her out of the hospital which seemed harsh at the time but she seems happier back in her normal surroundings..


the decision woud have been made based on multoiple factors including what is best for her. The thing is, there are X people waiting for an acute bed which are held up by Y people in acute wards waiting for Z community rehab/social care beds that are waiting for W home care/care home beds to be available . Everything gets backed up so while it may appear harsh that patients get shunted along the queue its done to alleviate the pressures elsewhere and understandably people worried that THEIR relative isnt being provided with the bed they need to move them along .

Back to the OP. some sort of reveiew does seem to be in order and frankly aside from the loss of fees maybe, the care home she is in may possibly be interested in moving her also as they may not be staffed to deal with such changes in requirements. That said - dont holod your breath for anything speedy to occur - at the best of times adult social care departments are woefully inadequantely resourced and at this time of year expect wholesale festive season holidays meaning the most bare bones cover staffed for absolute emergencies in place meaning any cases such as this don't even come close to be ing considered I suspect (as in she is "safe" wrt sheleter etc and not vulnerable in itself).

Best wishes for her and as sppedy a resolution possible whatever solution is best for her. And best wishes too for you and the rest of her family and friends atht are narturally concerned for her.

UncleEbenezer
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Re: any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

#273068

Postby UncleEbenezer » December 23rd, 2019, 2:54 pm

paulnumbers wrote:but she seems happier back in her normal surroundings.
.

Isn't that a telling bottom-line to the decision? Even if you suspect their motivation was mixed, you can't argue with that one.

paulnumbers
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Re: any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

#273147

Postby paulnumbers » December 23rd, 2019, 9:42 pm

didds wrote:
paulnumbers wrote: NHS were very keen to get her out of the hospital which seemed harsh at the time but she seems happier back in her normal surroundings..


the decision woud have been made based on multoiple factors including what is best for her. The thing is, there are X people waiting for an acute bed which are held up by Y people in acute wards waiting for Z community rehab/social care beds that are waiting for W home care/care home beds to be available . Everything gets backed up so while it may appear harsh that patients get shunted along the queue its done to alleviate the pressures elsewhere and understandably people worried that THEIR relative isnt being provided with the bed they need to move them along .

Back to the OP. some sort of reveiew does seem to be in order and frankly aside from the loss of fees maybe, the care home she is in may possibly be interested in moving her also as they may not be staffed to deal with such changes in requirements. That said - dont holod your breath for anything speedy to occur - at the best of times adult social care departments are woefully inadequantely resourced and at this time of year expect wholesale festive season holidays meaning the most bare bones cover staffed for absolute emergencies in place meaning any cases such as this don't even come close to be ing considered I suspect (as in she is "safe" wrt sheleter etc and not vulnerable in itself).

Best wishes for her and as sppedy a resolution possible whatever solution is best for her. And best wishes too for you and the rest of her family and friends atht are narturally concerned for her.


Thanks for the reply didds, all taken on board, and thanks for the good wishes. All seems ok with her so far.

paulnumbers
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Re: any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

#273489

Postby paulnumbers » December 26th, 2019, 10:45 pm

UncleEbenezer wrote:
paulnumbers wrote:but she seems happier back in her normal surroundings.
.

Isn't that a telling bottom-line to the decision? Even if you suspect their motivation was mixed, you can't argue with that one.


Yes absolutely.

csearle
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Re: any advice? 95 year old with dementia in care home

#276020

Postby csearle » January 8th, 2020, 7:23 pm

The way I see it (my mum's in a care home too) is that formal assessments when living in one's own home have to be made whenever the visiting staff find the care too demanding (because they have to adjust the number of carers attending and possibly the equipment). In a care home, the whole point is that they can be much more responsive and flexible on a day to day basis. For example if a client is having a good day then one carer can be enough but if the client transitions are challenging on a particular day then they can quickly draft in as many carers as necessary (because the homes always has several on duty day and night).

As she had a fall they need to assess how that happened and adapt their procedures. IMO they shouldn't be doing this with formal assessments but as a matter of their day-to-day care adaptations.

Chris


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