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Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

Genealogy, Local, General
PinkDalek
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Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

#284576

Postby PinkDalek » February 15th, 2020, 6:17 pm

Amongst my collection of RAFVR related items, I hold a copy of 'Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One' published by Longmans, 1942 reprint, code number 66301.

It was Designed to cover the A.T.C. and I.T.W. syllabus.

A.T.C. must be the Air Training Corps and I.T.W. is presumably the Initial Training Wing.

Can anyone explain the difference between the A.T.C. and the I.T.W.?

Did one follow the other, as suggested here http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/37/a1122337.shtml?

AleisterCrowley
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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

#284579

Postby AleisterCrowley » February 15th, 2020, 6:28 pm

I was in the ATC - which is a youth organisation sponsored by the RAF
I'm assuming the ITW is (was?) the first posting for people who actually join up

PinkDalek
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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

#284580

Postby PinkDalek » February 15th, 2020, 6:40 pm

Thanks, that makes sense.

Now to read:

The Battle of Britain, August-October 1940. Paperback – 1941 (HMSO)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Battle-Britain-August-October-1940/dp/B000LA8PKQ

Per ardua ad astra.

tjh290633
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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

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Postby tjh290633 » February 15th, 2020, 8:46 pm

The ATC was, and still is, an organisation within the RAFVR, taking children between the ages of about 14 to 18.

The ITW was the part of aircrew training for recruits to the RAF proper. Back in the dark ages when I learnt to fly we went through various stages. The first, after aptitude tests, was grading flying. That involved 12 hours on the Tiger Moth. If you went solo you were a Cadet Pilot, if not, a Cadet Navigator. Both then went to Initial Training School or ITS. This combined square bashing and tuition in aeronautical subjects, including meteorology. Then came Basic Flying Training, involving 60 hours on Chipmunks in our case. Also more ground school on typical subjects. The next stage was Advanced Flying Training, where we flew twin engined Oxfords for 120 hours. At the end of this we were awarded our wings. We moved on to Advanced Training, flying Meteor jets for 60 hours. Because the Korean War came to an end, most stopped at this point, although some would progress to an Operational Conversion Unit, aimed at the ultimate destination. That could involve air to air firing, bombing, air to ground firing, etc.

The ITW was the wartime name for the stages before flying training began.

TJH

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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

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Postby AleisterCrowley » February 15th, 2020, 9:02 pm

Did you pass through No.7 School of Recruit Training ???

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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

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Postby tjh290633 » February 15th, 2020, 9:13 pm

AleisterCrowley wrote:Did you pass through No.7 School of Recruit Training ???

No. My progress was Padgate for recruitment, Hornchurch for aptitude tests, Digby for grading flying, Kirton in Lindsey for ITS, Desford for BFTS, Pershore for AFTS and Worksop for AFS. My last 6 months was spent at 30MU Stoke Heath, helping to run the married quarters. I think that Pershore was No.16 AFTS. The other numbers may be in my log book.

TJH

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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

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Postby AleisterCrowley » February 15th, 2020, 9:23 pm

A lot of RAF personnel passed through there (including Ronnie Corbett and James Herriot!)
It's near my hometown, and I know several people living in the old officer (married quarters?) housing -the rest is industrial estate and country park now, it shut in the mid 60s

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Re: Elementary Meteorology for Aviators: Part One

#284633

Postby tjh290633 » February 15th, 2020, 11:26 pm

Just looked in my log book. Desford was No.5 BFTS, Pershore was No.10 AFTS, I don't have a number for Worksop. It is mentioned as No. 211 AFS on Wikipaedia, which ties in with Weston Zoyland being No.209 AFS. Valley was No.202 AFS.

There were 5 BFTS stations, Booker, Ansty, Derby, Bagington (Coventry) and Desford. All civilian run.

The AFTS locations that I can recall were Moreton in Marsh, Wellesbourne Mountford, Holme on Spalding Moor, Dalcross and Pershore.

It's a long time ago now.

TJH


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